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Spatial Impulse Wave

ENGLISH

Landslides and avalanches in natural lakes and reservoirs may generate so-called impulse waves. The run-up effects of these waves at the shore are similar to those of tsunamis. Hydraulic experiments in the laboratory help to estimate key wave characteristics, including the wave height and celerity. The picture presents two images of an experiment in the wave basin of the Laboratory of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW) at ETH Zurich. At the upper left, the moment shortly after the slide has hit the water surface is shown. The slide transfers its kinetic energy to the water and generates a wave. In the section on the lower right, the waves have propagated circularly from the impact location. The water is dyed white so that a grid can be projected onto the surface. During the experiment, this raster projection is simultaneously filmed by several cameras and the analysis of the image data allows for an accurate determination of the wave height decay.

GERMAN

Erdrutsche und Lawinen in natürliche Seen oder Stauseen können sogenannte Impulswellen auslösen. Die Auswirkungen beim Auflaufen dieser Wellen am Ufer sind mit denen von Tsunamis vergleichbar. Hydraulische Experimente im Labor helfen dabei, massgebliche Welleneigenschaften, wie beispielsweise die Höhe oder die Ausbreitungsgeschwindigkeit, abzuschätzen. Das Bild stellt zwei Aufnahmen eines Experiments im Wellenbecken der Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau, Hydrologie und Glaziologie der ETH Zürich zu unterschiedlichen Zeitpunkten dar. Oben links ist der Moment kurz nach dem Auftreffen des Rutsches auf die Wasseroberfläche zu sehen. Der Rutsch überträgt dabei seine Bewegungsenergie auf das Wasser und erzeugt eine Welle. Im Ausschnitt unten rechts haben sich die Wellen kreisförmig von der Eintauchstelle weg ausgebreitet. Das Wasser ist weiss eingefärbt, damit ein Raster auf die Oberfläche projiziert werden kann. Diese Rasterprojektion wird während des Experiments gleichzeitig von mehreren Kameras gefilmt und die Auswertung der Bilddaten ermöglicht eine genaue Bestimmung der Wellenhöhenabnahme.
DOI registered May 17, 2017 via DataCite.
Image

Functional Ecology And Imperfect Detection Of Species

Tobias Roth, Eric Allan, Peter B. Pearman & Valentin Amrhein
The zip files contains the r-package detectionfilter, which will make it possible to reproduce our results and to employ the computational methods that are presented in Roth et. al (2017). The package can be downloaded from www.github.com/TobiasRoth/detectionfilter. The package contains: a function to estimate observed meta-community data from communities that are subject to ecological and detection filtering, the analysed plant data from the Swiss biodiversity monitoring (www.biodiversitymonitoring.ch/en/home.html), the values for the three functional traits (specific leaf area, canopy height and seed mass) for the recorded species, a vignette (i.e. a documentation to an R-package) that develops the ideas behind the simulation of the meta-community, a vignette that describes the workflow to estimate the detection-corrected meta-community from observations, using the hierarchical models implemented in the r-package umarked, and a vignette that describes all the analyses conducted in this project.
DOI registered November 23, 2017 via DataCite.
SoftwareEnglish

Functional Ecology And Imperfect Detection Of Species

Tobias Roth, Eric Allan, Peter B. Pearman & Valentin Amrhein
The zip files contains the r-package detectionfilter, which will make it possible to reproduce our results and to employ the computational methods that are presented in Roth et. al (2017). The package can be downloaded from www.github.com/TobiasRoth/detectionfilter. The package contains: a function to estimate observed meta-community data from communities that are subject to ecological and detection filtering, the analysed plant data from the Swiss biodiversity monitoring (www.biodiversitymonitoring.ch/en/home.html), the values for the three functional traits (specific leaf area, canopy height and seed mass) for the recorded species, a vignette (i.e. a documentation to an R-package) that develops the ideas behind the simulation of the meta-community, a vignette that describes the workflow to estimate the detection-corrected meta-community from observations, using the hierarchical models implemented in the r-package umarked, and a vignette that describes all the analyses conducted in this project.
Other Identifiers
DOI registered November 23, 2017 via DataCite.
SoftwareEnglish

Single-Molecule Fret Reveals Multiscale Chromatin Dynamics Modulated By Hp1Α-Fig. 1Df

Sinan Kilic, Suren Felekyan, Olga Doroshenko, Iuliia Boichenko, Mykola Dimura, Hayk Vardanyan, Louise C. Bryan, Gaurav Arya, Claus.A.M. Seidel & Beat Fierz
smTIRF-FRET Data for Fig 1, for "Single-molecule FRET reveals multiscale chromatin dynamics modulated by HP1α"
DOI registered December 5, 2017 via DataCite.
Dataset

Single-Molecule Fret Reveals Multiscale Chromatin Dynamics Modulated By Hp1Α-Fig. 1Df

Sinan Kilic, Suren Felekyan, Olga Doroshenko, Iuliia Boichenko, Mykola Dimura, Hayk Vardanyan, Louise C. Bryan, Gaurav Arya, Claus.A.M. Seidel & Beat Fierz
smTIRF-FRET Data for Fig 1, for "Single-molecule FRET reveals multiscale chromatin dynamics modulated by HP1α"
Other Identifiers
DOI registered December 5, 2017 via DataCite.
Dataset

Single-Molecule Fret Reveals Multiscale Chromatin Dynamics Modulated By Hp1Α-Fig. 2Def

Sinan Kilic, Suren Felekyan, Olga Doroshenko, Iuliia Boichenko, Mykola Dimura, Hayk Vardanyan, Louise C. Bryan, Gaurav Arya, Claus A.M. Seidel & Beat Fierz
smTIRF-FRET Data for Fig 2, for "Single-molecule FRET reveals multiscale chromatin dynamics modulated by HP1α"
DOI registered December 5, 2017 via DataCite.
Dataset

Single-Molecule Fret Reveals Multiscale Chromatin Dynamics Modulated By Hp1Α-Fig. 2Def

Sinan Kilic, Suren Felekyan, Olga Doroshenko, Iuliia Boichenko, Mykola Dimura, Hayk Vardanyan, Louise C. Bryan, Gaurav Arya, Claus A.M. Seidel & Beat Fierz
smTIRF-FRET Data for Fig 2, for "Single-molecule FRET reveals multiscale chromatin dynamics modulated by HP1α"
Other Identifiers
DOI registered December 5, 2017 via DataCite.
Dataset

Single-Molecule Fret Reveals Multiscale Chromatin Dynamics Modulated By Hp1Α-Fig. 7Cde

Sinan Kilic, Suren Felekyan, Olga Doroshenko, Iuliia Boichenko, Mykola Dimura, Hayk Vardanyan, Louise C. Bryan, Gaurav Arya, Claus.A.M. Seidel & Beat Fierz
smTIRF-FRET Data for Fig 7, for "Single-molecule FRET reveals multiscale chromatin dynamics modulated by HP1α"
Other Identifiers
DOI registered December 5, 2017 via DataCite.
Dataset

Single-Molecule Fret Reveals Multiscale Chromatin Dynamics Modulated By Hp1Α-Fig. 7Cde

Sinan Kilic, Suren Felekyan, Olga Doroshenko, Iuliia Boichenko, Mykola Dimura, Hayk Vardanyan, Louise C. Bryan, Gaurav Arya, Claus.A.M. Seidel & Beat Fierz
smTIRF-FRET Data for Fig 7, for "Single-molecule FRET reveals multiscale chromatin dynamics modulated by HP1α"
DOI registered December 5, 2017 via DataCite.
1 View
Dataset

At-home Jomo Propitiation in Chug valley: video files

This dataset contains the videofiles belonging to the audio recording and texts and the completely transcribed, glossed, parsed and translated examples of the recordings that belong to the following publication: See also: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus. (2017). At-home Jomo Propitiation in Chug valley: Toolbox, transcriber and audio file [Data set]. Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3841815 Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus. 2020. Grammar of Duhumbi. Leiden: Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-40947-7. https://brill.com/view/title/55767 The explanation of all the grammatical features that occur in these sound files can be found in the Grammar of Duhumbi. Kesang was one of the last bon-po, practitioners of the traditional religious system in the Chug valley. This religious system has no ‘name’, but comes under what is often called ‘Bon’. The locus of propitiation is on the opposition between the high, in winter snow-clad mountain peaks phu (Tib. phu) that represent purity, cleanliness, goodness and beneficial powers versus the low-lying marshy, swampy areas da (tib. mdaḥ) that represent pollution, disease, evil and malevolent forces. In between these two there is a plethora of other local deities, many of which are local representations of the lha-srin bde-brgyad ‘eight classes of deities and demons’ also found in Tibetan Buddhism, but many of whom also represent deified human beings who have taken on some negative or positive force. It is the role of the bon-po to maintain the balance between the phu, the ‘good’ and the da, the ‘evil’ and hence prevent damage to humans and their livelihoods in the form of diseases, natural disasters, death etc. The phu-da religious system is not limited to the Chug valley, but, in various forms, can also be found among the related Khispi, Sartang and Sherdukpen people, as well as among the Tshangla speakers of West Kameng and eastern Bhutan. The main ritual conducted by the bon-po is called zhiwa (Tib. źi-ba ‘peace’) or jomo soykha (Tib. jo-mo gsol-kha ‘propitiation of the Jomo). It is conducted once before the 20th day of every Tibetan month. Jomo is the main female deity in the area (see also the files concerning the on-site Jomo propitiation). During this ritual, the bon-po first invites the Jomo and all other deities and spirits to attend the offering. He then offers nyingba (Tib. sñiṅ-ba ‘old’), also called lemchang, a mixtu...
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Audiovisual

At-home Jomo Propitiation in Chug valley: video files

This dataset contains the videofiles belonging to the audio recording and texts and the completely transcribed, glossed, parsed and translated examples of the recordings that belong to the following publication: See also: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus. (2017). At-home Jomo Propitiation in Chug valley: Toolbox, transcriber and audio file [Data set]. Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3841815 Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus. 2020. Grammar of Duhumbi. Leiden: Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-40947-7. https://brill.com/view/title/55767 The explanation of all the grammatical features that occur in these sound files can be found in the Grammar of Duhumbi. Kesang was one of the last bon-po, practitioners of the traditional religious system in the Chug valley. This religious system has no ‘name’, but comes under what is often called ‘Bon’. The locus of propitiation is on the opposition between the high, in winter snow-clad mountain peaks phu (Tib. phu) that represent purity, cleanliness, goodness and beneficial powers versus the low-lying marshy, swampy areas da (tib. mdaḥ) that represent pollution, disease, evil and malevolent forces. In between these two there is a plethora of other local deities, many of which are local representations of the lha-srin bde-brgyad ‘eight classes of deities and demons’ also found in Tibetan Buddhism, but many of whom also represent deified human beings who have taken on some negative or positive force. It is the role of the bon-po to maintain the balance between the phu, the ‘good’ and the da, the ‘evil’ and hence prevent damage to humans and their livelihoods in the form of diseases, natural disasters, death etc. The phu-da religious system is not limited to the Chug valley, but, in various forms, can also be found among the related Khispi, Sartang and Sherdukpen people, as well as among the Tshangla speakers of West Kameng and eastern Bhutan. The main ritual conducted by the bon-po is called zhiwa (Tib. źi-ba ‘peace’) or jomo soykha (Tib. jo-mo gsol-kha ‘propitiation of the Jomo). It is conducted once before the 20th day of every Tibetan month. Jomo is the main female deity in the area (see also the files concerning the on-site Jomo propitiation). During this ritual, the bon-po first invites the Jomo and all other deities and spirits to attend the offering. He then offers nyingba (Tib. sñiṅ-ba ‘old’), also called lemchang, a mixtu...
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Audiovisual

At-home Jomo Propitiation in Chug valley: Toolbox and audio file

Kesang was one of the last bon-po, practitioners of the traditional religious system in the Chug valley. This religious system has no ‘name’, but comes under what is often called ‘Bon’. The locus of propitiation is on the opposition between the high, in winter snow-clad mountain peaks phu (Tib. phu) that represent purity, cleanliness, goodness and beneficial powers versus the low-lying marshy, swampy areas da (tib. mdaḥ) that represent pollution, disease, evil and malevolent forces. In between these two there is a plethora of other local deities, many of which are local representations of the lha-srin bde-brgyad ‘eight classes of deities and demons’ also found in Tibetan Buddhism, but many of whom also represent deified human beings who have taken on some negative or positive force. It is the role of the bon-po to maintain the balance between the phu, the ‘good’ and the da, the ‘evil’ and hence prevent damage to humans and their livelihoods in the form of diseases, natural disasters, death etc. The phu-da religious system is not limited to the Chug valley, but, in various forms, can also be found among the related Khispi, Sartang and Sherdukpen people, as well as among the Tshangla speakers of West Kameng and eastern Bhutan. The main ritual conducted by the bon-po is called zhiwa (Tib. źi-ba ‘peace’) or jomo soykha (Tib. jo-mo gsol-kha ‘propitiation of the Jomo). It is conducted once before the 20th day of every Tibetan month. Jomo is the main female deity in the area (see also the files concerning the on-site Jomo propitiation). During this ritual, the bon-po first invites the Jomo and all other deities and spirits to attend the offering. He then offers nyingba (Tib. sñiṅ-ba ‘old’), also called lemchang, a mixture of rice, maize, finger millet (traditionally also wheat, barley, broomcorn millet, foxtail millet, buckwheat and amaranth) that has been kept fermenting for a long time. After that, he offers tochang, freshly cooked rice (Tib. lto-chaṅ ‘food-liquor’), and after that darcok (Tib. dar-lcog ‘prayer flags’), small twigs with triangular-shaped flags made of traditional paper. He then conducts a prediction for the coming month, by making three heaps of a mixture of grains, and interprets the way in which these grains pattern. He then sends off the assembled deities. Bon-po Kesang died in early 2016. His son...
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Dataset

At-home Jomo Propitiation in Chug valley: Toolbox, transcriber and audio file

This dataset contains the .wav sound files, .trs Transcriber files, .txt Toolbox-compatible Notepad files and .pdf files with the completely transcribed, glossed, parsed and translated examples of the following recordings that belong to the following publication: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus. 2020. Grammar of Duhumbi. Leiden: Brill. ISBN 978-90-04-40947-7. https://brill.com/view/title/55767 CHUK221212D2A Bonpo prediction text. The explanation of all the grammatical features that occur in these sound files can be found in the Grammar of Duhumbi. The main Toolbox files can be found in the zip file “Settings”, this includes the IPA keys for Duhumbi, the entire setup of the Toolbox database, and the Duhumbi dictionary and Parsing dictionary. The .wav, .txt and .trs files combined in the same folder will enable to open Toolbox and work with the recordings, e.g. play them sentence for sentence and see the transcriptions and translations. Transcriber version 1.5.1: http://trans.sourceforge.net/en/presentation.php or https://osdn.net/projects/sfnet_trans/downloads/transcriber/1.5.1/Transcriber-1.5.1-Windows.exe/ Toolbox version 1.6.1: https://software.sil.org/toolbox/download/ For the metadata of the sound files in this data set, I refer to Chapter 13 Texts in the Grammar of Duhumbi. This Chapter has a complete listing of the texts, their topics, the speakers and their background etc. Kesang was one of the last bon-po, practitioners of the traditional religious system in the Chug valley. This religious system has no ‘name’, but comes under what is often called ‘Bon’. The locus of propitiation is on the opposition between the high, in winter snow-clad mountain peaks phu (Tib. phu) that represent purity, cleanliness, goodness and beneficial powers versus the low-lying marshy, swampy areas da (tib. mdaḥ) that represent pollution, disease, evil and malevolent forces. In between these two there is a plethora of other local deities, many of which are local representations of the lha-srin bde-brgyad ‘eight classes of deities and demons’ also found in Tibetan Buddhism, but many of whom also represent deified human beings who have taken on some negative or positive force. It is the role of the bon-po to maintain the balance between the phu, the ‘good’ and the da, the ‘evil’ and hence prevent damage to humans and their livelihoods in the form of diseases, natural disasters, death etc. The phu-da religiou...
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Dataset

At-home Jomo Propitiation in Chug valley: photo files

Kesang was one of the last bon-po, practitioners of the traditional religious system in the Chug valley. This religious system has no ‘name’, but comes under what is often called ‘Bon’. The locus of propitiation is on the opposition between the high, in winter snow-clad mountain peaks phu (Tib. phu) that represent purity, cleanliness, goodness and beneficial powers versus the low-lying marshy, swampy areas da (tib. mdaḥ) that represent pollution, disease, evil and malevolent forces. In between these two there is a plethora of other local deities, many of which are local representations of the lha-srin bde-brgyad ‘eight classes of deities and demons’ also found in Tibetan Buddhism, but many of whom also represent deified human beings who have taken on some negative or positive force. It is the role of the bon-po to maintain the balance between the phu, the ‘good’ and the da, the ‘evil’ and hence prevent damage to humans and their livelihoods in the form of diseases, natural disasters, death etc. The phu-da religious system is not limited to the Chug valley, but, in various forms, can also be found among the related Khispi, Sartang and Sherdukpen people, as well as among the Tshangla speakers of West Kameng and eastern Bhutan. The main ritual conducted by the bon-po is called zhiwa (Tib. źi-ba ‘peace’) or jomo soykha (Tib. jo-mo gsol-kha ‘propitiation of the Jomo). It is conducted once before the 20th day of every Tibetan month. Jomo is the main female deity in the area (see also the files concerning the on-site Jomo propitiation). During this ritual, the bon-po first invites the Jomo and all other deities and spirits to attend the offering. He then offers nyingba (Tib. sñiṅ-ba ‘old’), also called lemchang, a mixture of rice, maize, finger millet (traditionally also wheat, barley, broomcorn millet, foxtail millet, buckwheat and amaranth) that has been kept fermenting for a long time. After that, he offers tochang, freshly cooked rice (Tib. lto-chaṅ ‘food-liquor’), and after that darcok (Tib. dar-lcog ‘prayer flags’), small twigs with triangular-shaped flags made of traditional paper. He then conducts a prediction for the coming month, by making three heaps of a mixture of grains, and interprets the way in which these grains pattern. He then sends off the assembled deities. Bon-po Kesang died in early 2016. His son...
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Image

At-home Jomo Propitiation in Chug valley: photo files

Kesang was one of the last bon-po, practitioners of the traditional religious system in the Chug valley. This religious system has no ‘name’, but comes under what is often called ‘Bon’. The locus of propitiation is on the opposition between the high, in winter snow-clad mountain peaks phu (Tib. phu) that represent purity, cleanliness, goodness and beneficial powers versus the low-lying marshy, swampy areas da (tib. mdaḥ) that represent pollution, disease, evil and malevolent forces. In between these two there is a plethora of other local deities, many of which are local representations of the lha-srin bde-brgyad ‘eight classes of deities and demons’ also found in Tibetan Buddhism, but many of whom also represent deified human beings who have taken on some negative or positive force. It is the role of the bon-po to maintain the balance between the phu, the ‘good’ and the da, the ‘evil’ and hence prevent damage to humans and their livelihoods in the form of diseases, natural disasters, death etc. The phu-da religious system is not limited to the Chug valley, but, in various forms, can also be found among the related Khispi, Sartang and Sherdukpen people, as well as among the Tshangla speakers of West Kameng and eastern Bhutan. The main ritual conducted by the bon-po is called zhiwa (Tib. źi-ba ‘peace’) or jomo soykha (Tib. jo-mo gsol-kha ‘propitiation of the Jomo). It is conducted once before the 20th day of every Tibetan month. Jomo is the main female deity in the area (see also the files concerning the on-site Jomo propitiation). During this ritual, the bon-po first invites the Jomo and all other deities and spirits to attend the offering. He then offers nyingba (Tib. sñiṅ-ba ‘old’), also called lemchang, a mixture of rice, maize, finger millet (traditionally also wheat, barley, broomcorn millet, foxtail millet, buckwheat and amaranth) that has been kept fermenting for a long time. After that, he offers tochang, freshly cooked rice (Tib. lto-chaṅ ‘food-liquor’), and after that darcok (Tib. dar-lcog ‘prayer flags’), small twigs with triangular-shaped flags made of traditional paper. He then conducts a prediction for the coming month, by making three heaps of a mixture of grains, and interprets the way in which these grains pattern. He then sends off the assembled deities. Bon-po Kesang died in early 2016. His son...
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Image

Bangru Language Data: sound files (uncut)

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students). This material is made freely available to everyone for informative or scientific purposes as long as the source (this DOI) / the collectors are properly credited. Please note that use of the material for commercial purposes of any kind, which includes conversion into commercial audio-visual media (documentaries etc.), storage and dissemination through sites that require registration & payment for access, or sites that rely on advertisement (including YouTube) is not permitted without specific written consent from the speakers and their community, obtained through the collectors of the material. By downloading our material, you agree to these restrictions. This data set falls under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license. This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the identical terms. License Deed on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. Legal Code on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode.
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Audiovisual

Bangru Language Data: sound files (uncut)

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students). This material is made freely available to everyone for informative or scientific purposes as long as the source (this DOI) / the collectors are properly credited. Please note that use of the material for commercial purposes of any kind, which includes conversion into commercial audio-visual media (documentaries etc.), storage and dissemination through sites that require registration & payment for access, or sites that rely on advertisement (including YouTube) is not permitted without specific written consent from the speakers and their community, obtained through the collectors of the material. By downloading our material, you agree to these restrictions. This data set falls under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license. This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the identical terms. License Deed on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. Legal Code on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode.
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Audiovisual

Bangru Language Data - Cut sound files

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students). This material is made freely available to everyone for informative or scientific purposes as long as the source (this DOI) / the collectors are properly credited. Please note that use of the material for commercial purposes of any kind, which includes conversion into commercial audio-visual media (documentaries etc.), storage and dissemination through sites that require registration & payment for access, or sites that rely on advertisement (including YouTube) is not permitted without specific written consent from the speakers and their community, obtained through the collectors of the material. By downloading our material, you agree to these restrictions. This data set falls under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license. This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the identical terms. License Deed on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. Legal Code on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode.
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Audiovisual

Bangru Language Data - Cut sound files

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students). This material is made freely available to everyone for informative or scientific purposes as long as the source (this DOI) / the collectors are properly credited. Please note that use of the material for commercial purposes of any kind, which includes conversion into commercial audio-visual media (documentaries etc.), storage and dissemination through sites that require registration & payment for access, or sites that rely on advertisement (including YouTube) is not permitted without specific written consent from the speakers and their community, obtained through the collectors of the material. By downloading our material, you agree to these restrictions. This data set falls under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license. This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the identical terms. License Deed on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. Legal Code on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode.
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Audiovisual

Bangru Language Data: NEILS 2014 presentations

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students). This material is made freely available to everyone for informative or scientific purposes as long as the source (this DOI) / the collectors are properly credited. Please note that use of the material for commercial purposes of any kind, which includes conversion into commercial audio-visual media (documentaries etc.), storage and dissemination through sites that require registration & payment for access, or sites that rely on advertisement (including YouTube) is not permitted without specific written consent from the speakers and their community, obtained through the collectors of the material. By downloading our material, you agree to these restrictions. This data set falls under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license. This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the identical terms. License Deed on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. Legal Code on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode.
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Text

Bangru Language Data: NEILS 2014 presentations

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students). This material is made freely available to everyone for informative or scientific purposes as long as the source (this DOI) / the collectors are properly credited. Please note that use of the material for commercial purposes of any kind, which includes conversion into commercial audio-visual media (documentaries etc.), storage and dissemination through sites that require registration & payment for access, or sites that rely on advertisement (including YouTube) is not permitted without specific written consent from the speakers and their community, obtained through the collectors of the material. By downloading our material, you agree to these restrictions. This data set falls under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license. This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the identical terms. License Deed on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. Legal Code on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode.
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Text

Bangru Language Data - various descriptions and analyses

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students). This material is made freely available to everyone for informative or scientific purposes as long as the source (this DOI) / the collectors are properly credited. Please note that use of the material for commercial purposes of any kind, which includes conversion into commercial audio-visual media (documentaries etc.), storage and dissemination through sites that require registration & payment for access, or sites that rely on advertisement (including YouTube) is not permitted without specific written consent from the speakers and their community, obtained through the collectors of the material. By downloading our material, you agree to these restrictions. This data set falls under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license. This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the identical terms. License Deed on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. Legal Code on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode.
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Text

Bangru Language Data - various descriptions and analyses

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students). This material is made freely available to everyone for informative or scientific purposes as long as the source (this DOI) / the collectors are properly credited. Please note that use of the material for commercial purposes of any kind, which includes conversion into commercial audio-visual media (documentaries etc.), storage and dissemination through sites that require registration & payment for access, or sites that rely on advertisement (including YouTube) is not permitted without specific written consent from the speakers and their community, obtained through the collectors of the material. By downloading our material, you agree to these restrictions. This data set falls under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA) license. This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as you credit us and license your new creations under the identical terms. License Deed on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/. Legal Code on https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode.
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Text

Bangru Language Data: overview file

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students).
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Text

Bangru Language Data: overview file

These files form the empirical basis for the following article: Bodt, Timotheus Adrianus and Ismael Lieberherr. 2015. First notes on the phonology and classification of the Bangru language of India. Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 38:1 (2015), 66–123. doi 10.1075/ltba.38.1.03bod issn 0731–3500 / e-issn 2214–5907 © John Benjamins Publishing Company These data were collected in Sarli circle, Kurung Kumey district, Arunachal Pradesh, India. The data collectors were the following faculty, students and associated researchers of the Department of English and Foreign Languages, Tezpur University, Assam, India: Nupur Sinha (Faculty), Ismael Lieberherr (Affiliated PhD scholar), Timotheus A. Bodt (Affiliated PhD scholar), Diksha Konwar, Eshani Baishya, Nawaf Helmi, Pinaz Mirza, Ratul Mahela, Sansuma Brahma (students).
DOI registered December 14, 2017 via DataCite.
Text